Giving Back

Evolva supports the three main aims of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) – the conservation of biodiversity, the sustainable use of its components, and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from genetic resources.

Giving back
We donate 1% of our product-derived revenues to support the conservation of biodiversity and basic science education in developing countries. We have a particular interest in supporting low-key, unglamorous, or underappreciated projects/efforts that nonetheless have the potential to make a positive impact on biodiversity and science education.

Recipients
In 2015 we identified our first recipients for receiving financial support. They are as follows:

Stephan Herrera
Stephan Herrera

Surendra Varma | Wildlife biologist, Asian Nature Conservation Fund

Focus: human-elephant conflict reduction and elephant welfare

Why we like his work: Among other things, Surendra Varma leverages science education, capacity building, and public engagement not just to reduce human-elephant conflict in villages and farms, but also to improve public policy and conservation efforts that benefit the Asian Elephant in India and throughout Asia.

Quotable: “I want to create a science curriculum that is simplified and user-friendly for the public, and can help create awareness for people to participate in conservation measures.”

Kabir Peay | Assistant Professor of Biology, Stanford University

Focus: Fungi research in the Lambir Hills National Park in Sarawak, Malaysia on the island of Borneo.

Why we like his work: Because of the importance of fungi, known as the “microbiome of the forest”, insights from this research could prove useful for the conservation of biodiversity in rainforests around the world.

Quotable: “It’s hard to appreciate what you don’t know even exists. And fungi, bacteria and insects are effectively invisible to most people. But, I have personally noticed that people begin to care about conservation as they start to understand the ecosystems around them. Ultimately I think this type of research can help create appreciation for biodiversity and a desire to conserve it.”

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